Naushad's favourite meal..

Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickers

Our lil' Naushad

Lilypie First Birthday tickers

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Baby's progress

Salam...ni aku dpt from www.mumcentremalaysia.com...banyak info yg buley dpt kat sini..ni aku post salah satunyer...

At 1 month
The first month is a wonderful period of discovery — discovering your baby’s likes and dislikes, your child discovering new sensations and sounds, and the both of you discovering each other.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Moves head from side to side
• Gazes at human faces
• Can focus on objects up to about 12 inches away (without seeing details)
• Blinks at bright lights
• May follow an object with gaze but loses it after a while
• Likes contrasting colors and patterns
• Has strong reflexes
• Brings hands to face
• Turns towards familiar voices and sounds
• Likes skin contact with closest caregivers
• May smile at familiar faces

Language and emotions
• Responds to loud sounds
• Cries if over or under-stimulated
• Makes small cooing noises

Feeding
• If breast-fed: Most breastfed babies feed ‘on demand’, i.e. whenever hungry
• If formula-fed: A one-month-old will usually drink about three to four ounces of milk per feeding (about 18 to 32 ounces a day)
• May pass stools at least three times a day

Sleep
Your baby may have more established sleep-wake patterns, sleeping every two to three hours, awaking to feed then going to sleep again. Remember to place baby on his/ her back for bedtime!

Your baby should be sleeping for at least 16 to 18 hours a day. However, some newborns tend to be more wakeful than others and this is perfectly normal.

Ideal toys for this age
• Child-safe music boxes
• Child-safe activity mirrors
• Stuffed toys (without sharp and/ or metal parts)

Useful tips
Give baby some tummy time so that he/ she can look at the world in a different way. Also, it’s never too early to begin reading to your child. Use a steady tone — but keep it expressive, low and comforting — to help strengthen the bond between you.

At 2 months
You may begin noticing more dramatic changes in your baby, especially in gross-motor skills and how he/ she responds to you. Be ready to snap those first, responsive smiles!

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Briefly lifts head
• Smiles directly at familiar faces
• Imitates facial expressions
• Shows obvious liking for visual stimulation
• Kicks and waves arms when excited
• Begins unclenching fists
• Correctly locates frontal sounds
• Personality traits start becoming more obvious
• May begin learning the relationship between cause and effect
• May briefly hold a rattle

Language and emotions
• Gurgles and squeals when happy
• Shows emotions more easily
• May repeat vowel noises like “ooh” and “aah”

Feeding
• If breast-fed: May nurse at least once every three hours. Your breasts should feel softer after each feeding
• If formula-fed: From now till the next few months, baby may drink about four to six ounces of milk per feeding (about 23 to 32 ounces a day)
• May pass stools less often than during the first month

Sleep
Your baby should now be able to sleep for longer stretches in the night.

Ideal toys for this age
• Floor gyms (with kicking toys)
• Activity mats

Useful tips
If you are a working mum, allow baby to spend more time with other caregivers such as the grandparents or babysitter. This allows them to establish a bond with baby before the end of your confinement period.


At 3 months

Has it been three months already? Your baby is now probably much more awake and alert than he/ she has ever been before this. Now is also a great “hands-on” time for play and learning!

At 4 months

Your baby will soon be amazing you with his/ her developing language skills. Yes, those chuckling, sputtering, blubbering sounds are actually precursors for speech! So keep speaking to your child and don’t forget to applaud his/ her every attempt at copying you!

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Lifts head up by 90 degrees
• Has stronger neck support
• Is able to follow objects with eyes in a 180-degree arc
• Clearly recognises bottle or breast
• Recognises that people have labels (that you are ‘mama’, father is ‘dada’ etc)
• Likes to explore things by putting them in mouth
• Reaches for favourite objects
• Responds more actively to rattle or bell sounds
• Makes gestures such as waving arms to be picked up
• Supports weight on legs with help
• May sit with support
• May roll over from stomach to back

Language and emotions
• Makes sputtering sounds
• Babbles more often
• Experiments with new noises by changing shape of mouth
• Laughs when tickled – may even belly laugh!

Sleep
Babies usually sleep for a stretch of at least six to eight hours a night by this age and take two or three naps in the day.

Ideal toys for this age
Toys with flashing lights and sounds

Useful tips
Do you know that baby can enjoy a good book even at this age? Don’t worry if he/ she is more interested in eating it than reading it. Choose colourful board books, such as books about shapes and colours or books with different-textured fabric swatches.
Now is usually the time when many parents attempt weaning. Do not be discouraged if baby reacts negatively to solids. It is quite a strange experience for baby’s taste buds after all. If baby doesn’t like it, leave weaning attempts aside for a while and try again a week or two later.

At 5 months

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Experiments with concept of cause and effect
• More observant of small objects
• Able to see clearly across the room
• Uses hands more confidently (usually in a raking fashion) to bring objects closer
• Transfers objects from hand to hand
• Pushes away if he/ she dislikes what you are doing (wiping off drool, etc)
• Plays with toes
• Sits with support
• Rolls over from stomach to back
• May begin teething
• May be ready to wean

Language and emotions
Tries to imitate sounds

Feeding
Solids should be introduced very cautiously. Signs that baby is ready to begin weaning include:

• Being able to hold the head up well
• Being interested in solid food
• Having a good tongue reflex to push solid food in or out (to aid swallowing and prevent choking)
• Being able to open mouth to receive a spoon

Ideal toys for this age
• Squeeze toys with squeaky sounds
• Handheld musical toys such as toy telephones

Useful tips
Notice how much your child loves to watch you? Now is actually a great time to try baby sign language. Teaching baby simple signs with facial expressions and hand movements can help enhance communication skills even at this pre-verbal stage. Don’t worry if baby doesn’t pick it up right away. Consult a baby sign language book for more information (available at most bookstores).
Your baby is ready to hit a number of important milestones this month. Don’t worry if baby doesn’t achieve all the milestones listed below. This is completely normal. In fact, some babies lag behind in certain areas while shooting ahead in others. Always check with your pediatrician if you are worried about your child’s development.

At 6 months

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Keeps head level when pulled to a sitting position
• Sits with minimal support
• Holds bottle for feeding
• Drinks from a cup with help
• Opens mouth for spoon
• Rolls over and back
• Begins teething

Language and emotions
• Combines vowel-consonant sounds
• Makes two-syllable sounds (e.g. ma-ma)
• Imitates facial expressions

Sleep
Are you still co-sleeping with your child? While there are many bonding advantages to this, do try teaching him/ her to sleep independently. The older baby gets, the more resistant he/she will become towards sleeping alone.

Ideal toys for this age
• Board books
• Stacking toys
• Child-safe blocks

Useful tips
Enhance baby’s gross and fine-motor skills by stacking up a block tower together and letting him/ her knock it down.


At 7 months

Your baby is ready to begin moving around the house so start putting away potential hazards now! It’s a good idea to warn the grandparents and other caregivers too so that baby is never in harm’s way no matter where he/ she is.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Looks for something that has dropped
• Adjusts position of hand using visual control
• Sits well
• Lunges forward from sitting position to grasp an object
• Feeds himself/ herself a cracker
• Grasps sippy cup more confidently with fingers around cup
• Gets up on all fours and rocks back and forth
• May begin to crawl or shuffle bottom

Language and emotions
• Able to blow kisses and repeat act if praised
• Recognises name and other familiar sounds such as favourite music
• Begins to understand meaning of “No”

Feeding
Baby is ready to be placed on his/ her high chair at mealtimes. Always be watchful, especially if baby loves to lunge forward. Because their meals are supplemented with solids, babies at this age may drink less milk—an average of 18 to 24 ounces a day.

Sleep
Is baby having trouble sleeping? Walk him/ her around the house at bedtime, saying goodnight to each favourite object. This is both soothing and an excellent way to increase his/ her vocabulary.

Ideal toys for this age
• Stacking and nesting toys
• Shape-sorting toys
• Toys that encourage crawling/ standing

Useful tips
Although seven-month-olds are far from social animals, it’s not a bad idea to organise play dates with babies of similar age. The benefits are manifold. It can improve your child’s cognitive and emotional development. It also serves as a social zone for new parents seeking friends to exchange ideas and experiences with.

At 8 months

Baby is in a busy phase now, ready to use his/ her hands for a variety of meaningful gestures. He/ she is quite the explorer now too so always keep a close eye on baby’s movements! Keep in mind that each child is different. It’s normal for babies to achieve these milestones a little later than others. Do consult your child’s paediatrician if you are worried.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Understands object permanence—that his/ her toys don’t disappear when hidden
• Crawls easily, even when holding an object
• Uses thumb and index finger (pincer grasp) to pick up or move toys around and also investigate small spaces
• Remembers recent events
• May attempt to stand, while holding onto a chair or table

Language and emotions
• Begins to show signs of extreme attachment to main caregiver — also called 'separation anxiety'
• Experiments with a variety of vowel and possibly, consonant sounds

Sleep
Babies at this age may wake up at night all over again. It can be frustrating for parents who have gotten used to getting some sleep at last. But be patient. Your baby will soon be getting more active and as a result, tire more easily and sleep better too.

Ideal toys for this age
• Toys with attachments like levers and buttons that produce sounds when pressed
• Baby-friendly snap-together toys
• Board books that encourage pointing, touching, stroking etc

Useful tips
Encourage your baby to get physically involved with toys. If he/she drops a toy, teach baby to lunge, reach for it or roll it to you on his/ her own. Help to show baby what happens when he/ she pushes a button or lever. These exercises will help to strengthen your child’s muscles for other physical changes to come.

At 9 months

Watch out for an increasingly independent child! Your baby may move so quickly that you won’t realise he/ she is already across the room in mere seconds. You’ll also find that objects placed out of reach previously are no longer safe as baby begins pulling himself/ herself up to a standing position.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Sits, crawls and shuffles more easily and confidently
• Stands by pulling himself/ herself up while holding onto something
• Has more developed pincer grasp
• Shakes, bangs, drops and throws things
• Waves goodbye
• Begins to enjoy peek-a-boo and other simple games
• May walk while holding onto furniture (also called cruising)

Language and emotions
• Understands simple words and possibly even phrases
• Baby’s personality and likes and dislikes are easier to determine
• May become emotionally attached to a “security” object like a doll, plush toy or blanket

Feeding
Your baby will now have a distinct preference for certain foods. While this can be helpful at feeding time, you will still need to encourage variety by introducing new, healthy ingredients. Baby may also want to exert new-found independence by feeding himself/ herself. One solution is to present baby an extra spoon during mealtimes to prevent potential tussles.

Ideal toys for this age
• Toys that encourage standing/ cruising
• Role-play toys such as toy telephones
• Toys that encourage language development

Useful tips
Speak to baby often to encourage speech. Reserve “No” for situations that really demand it. This ensures that your baby develops the self-confidence and independence to try something new on his/ her own.

At 10 months

You must often pause to wonder how energetic a 10-month-old can be. If your baby still hasn’t tried to walk yet, relax. Many children are only ready to begin after their 12th month.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Anticipates favourite moments, e.g. clapping parts in a song
• Remembers certain gestures and outcomes associated with them e.g. picking up keys indicates going out
• Perceives depth, e.g. may not be willing to crawl down stairs head first
• Walks while holding on to furniture
• May walk while holding onto your hands (let baby go barefoot at home but consider getting soft shoes for outings)

Language and emotions
• Communicates wishes by pointing
• Responds to one or two familiar commands
• May try to imitate a barking dog or passing car
• Shows stronger separation anxiety

Feeding
It takes time for babies to use a cup without making a mess. Once your baby drinks more than she spills, try giving him/ her breastmilk in the cup.

Sleep
At this age, babies typically sleep for 10 to 12 hours a night and take two daytime naps averaging about an hour and a half each.

Ideal toys for this age
• Toys that encourage walking
• Large balls
• Baby-safe cooking/ tool bench toys

Useful tips
Separation anxiety can be frustrating for parents. If your baby is glued to you, offer plenty of practice time by leaving him/ her in the babysitter’s company and going to another room. A few minutes later, come back to say hello and leave again. Do this a few times over a few days. Your baby will soon learn that it’s safe to be without you and that you’ll always come back.

At 11 months

Babies are so enraptured by the world around them. You’ll be surprised by how quickly they will notice tiny but potentially dangerous hazards, especially now that they’re trying to walk. Do have another look around the house to see if there’s anything you may have missed earlier - e.g. dangling cords, power sockets, sharp-edged kitchen gadgets etc.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Drinks easily from a cup
• Knows that small things can fit into larger ones
• Pushes, throws, knocks down everything in sight
• Sits more confidently; able to pull self up and sit again
• Walks while holding onto your fingers

Language and emotions
• Says “mama” and “dada” and knows what they mean
• Babbling develops into intonations of language
• May say other words and know their meaning too

Feeding
It’s common for mums to wean their babies off breastmilk by the first birthday. If you plan to, begin now by dropping one feed at a time, offering a bottle or cup instead. Gradual weaning will be more pleasant and comfortable for both you and your child.

Ideal toys for this age
• Pushing and pulling toys
• Fix-together toys
• Colourful containers and items to put in and remove

Useful tips
Baby walkers have received a bad rap from child development experts for years. Experts believe that not only are walkers dangerous, they are also not very effective to begin with.

At 12 months

As baby approaches his/ her first birthday, you’ll be stunned by how quickly he/ she is learning to speak, walk and possibly even recite a few letters of the alphabet!

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Anticipates actions, e.g. puts his/ her hands up for wearing a tee shirt or dress
• Pushes aside toys to grab toy that was out of view
• May walk independently

Language and emotions
• Displays affection e.g. hugs, kisses, smiles
• Uses sounds from language he/ she hears most
• Understands a significant amount of what is being said
• Imitates favourite sounds e.g. woof-woof, meow, ring-ring

Feeding
Now’s an ideal period to place baby in his/ her high chair and have him/ her join the whole family during mealtimes. It’s normal for baby to get distracted and not eat as much but repeated exposure will help him/ her to eventually learn what is expected.

Ideal toys for this age
• Wooden rocking toys e.g. rocking horse
• Baby swing
• Educational board books and flashcards

Useful tips
Now that your baby understands a lot of what is being said, why not teach him/ her alphabets and numbers? Alphabet and number flash cards can be both fun and educational if both parent and child are happily involved and make a great game of it.

As baby approaches his/ her first birthday, you’ll be stunned by how quickly he/ she is learning to speak, walk and possibly even recite a few letters of the alphabet!

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Anticipates actions, e.g. puts his/ her hands up for wearing a tee shirt or dress
• Pushes aside toys to grab toy that was out of view
• May walk independently

Language and emotions
• Displays affection e.g. hugs, kisses, smiles
• Uses sounds from language he/ she hears most
• Understands a significant amount of what is being said
• Imitates favourite sounds e.g. woof-woof, meow, ring-ring

Feeding
Now’s an ideal period to place baby in his/ her high chair and have him/ her join the whole family during mealtimes. It’s normal for baby to get distracted and not eat as much but repeated exposure will help him/ her to eventually learn what is expected.

Ideal toys for this age
• Wooden rocking toys e.g. rocking horse
• Baby swing
• Educational board books and flashcards

Useful tips
Now that your baby understands a lot of what is being said, why not teach him/ her alphabets and numbers? Alphabet and number flash cards can be both fun and educational if both parent and child are happily involved and make a great game of it.

At 12 months to 18 months

Around your child’s first birthday, make an appointment for his/ her well-child exam. These trips to the pediatrician are essential to ensure that your child is developing healthily. It’s also a good time to have your parenting doubts and fears put to rest.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Knows function of toys, e.g. hugs plush toys, pushes button on pop-up toys, builds with blocks
• Carries toys from place to place
• By 15 months, uses wrists independently from arms
• Identifies one or more body parts
• May walk on his/ her own but still stumbles
• May climb stairs

Language and emotions
• Uses more words (that may only be intelligible to you)
• Smiles at own reflection
• Develops his/ her sense of humour
• Shows larger range of emotions e.g. anger and frustration along with pleasure, excitement etc.
• More interested in other children (but still won’t play with them)

Feeding
Your one-year-old now has about eight teeth. And possibly, a fussy palate. Your child may just nibble one day and gobble the next. You can easily cater to these changing whims and fancies by providing smaller meals and nutritious snacks throughout the day.

Sleep
Until two years old, your toddler will require two naps in the afternoon to keep him/ her alert and happy. In total, 12 to 18-month-olds need about 14 hours of sleep.

Ideal toys for this age
• Child-safe play sets/ dollhouses
• Puzzle sets (large pieces made of wood is ideal)
• Battery-operated riding toys (age-appropriate)
• Climbing gyms (age-appropriate)

Useful tips
Give your child’s confidence a helping hand by showing him/ her a “can do” attitude. Studies prove that when you repeatedly tell your child he/ she is good at something, the child will actually do better in that area, be it social skills, speech or even math!

At 18 to 24 months

Your child is probably spending most of his/ her time upright by now. You can encourage this by massaging the legs after a bath and also introducing kicking exercises.

What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Drinks easily from a cup
• Knows that small things can fit into larger ones
• Pushes, throws, knocks down everything in sight
• Sits more confidently; able to pull self up and sit again
• Walks while holding onto your fingers

Language and emotions
• Says “mama” and “dada” and knows what they mean
• Babbling develops into intonations of language
• May say other words and know their meaning too

Feeding
It’s common for mums to wean their babies off breastmilk by the first birthday. If you plan to, begin now by dropping one feed at a time, offering a bottle or cup instead. Gradual weaning will be more pleasant and comfortable for both you and your child.

Ideal toys for this age
• Pushing and pulling toys
• Fix-together toys
• Colourful containers and items to put in and remove

Useful tips
Baby walkers have received a bad rap from child development experts for years. Experts believe that not only are walkers dangerous, they are also not very effective to begin with.



What your child might do:


Physically and mentally
• Drinks easily from a cup
• Knows that small things can fit into larger ones
• Pushes, throws, knocks down everything in sight
• Sits more confidently; able to pull self up and sit again
• Walks while holding onto your fingers

Language and emotions
• Says “mama” and “dada” and knows what they mean
• Babbling develops into intonations of language
• May say other words and know their meaning too

Feeding
It’s common for mums to wean their babies off breastmilk by the first birthday. If you plan to, begin now by dropping one feed at a time, offering a bottle or cup instead. Gradual weaning will be more pleasant and comfortable for both you and your child.

Ideal toys for this age
• Pushing and pulling toys
• Fix-together toys
• Colourful containers and items to put in and remove

Useful tips
Baby walkers have received a bad rap from child development experts for years. Experts believe that not only are walkers dangerous, they are also not very effective to begin with.


Happy reading!!!

No comments: